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Observations from my Study Window

Bearded Dragon lizard stretched out in the shade

Bearded Dragon resting in the shade

My study window with its view of the back yard and its wildlife can be quite a distraction. I often see Hares (up to three at once) and not long ago there was a Fox, large as life and in good condition. Both are surprising in an increasingly urbanised outer Brisbane.

Following the Fox citing the Hares seemed to disappear for a long period, until this week when I noted a lone Hare grazing in the back yard. Perhaps the others contributed to the Fox’s good condition.

Kookaburras in breeding season inhabit a tree just outside the study window, generally as a family of four adults and after fledging with one or two young. If I am on the phone when they burst into a family territorial call I have to ask the other person to wait until they finish. This racket is deafening, but I find the strangled squawks of the young learning to call great entertainment.

The big ears of the Hares make them easy to spot but there is other wildlife such as Bearded Dragons that are not so easy to see.

A couple of Beaded Dragons have shared our property for some years now and are quite large. They motor around the yard apparently without fear of any danger and I have only seen one causality, which was from a neighbour’s dog. Kookaburras leave them alone. They only become apparent from my window in their stationary pose – head and tail up like a shallow “U”. Out walking you can come upon them quite by accident as they sun themselves on tree trunks. In this pose their wonderfully camouflaged skin makes them hard to spot.

Today Judy called me to the back yard where she nearly stepped on a fine specimen stretched out in the shade. It was a very hot afternoon and the Dragon was stretched out with its hind legs also stretched out lying parallel to its tail. We’ve not seen this behaviour before and can only assume it was cooling down. Interesting.

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